GSA Provides Open Access to Haitian Earthquake Research

Here is an announcement just released from The Geological Society of America:
Boulder, CO, USA – In response to the 12 January 2010 earthquakes in Haiti, The Geological Society of America has compiled a list of open-access papers on the Caribbean plate and the Enriquillo-Plaintain fault line. These articles, from GSA Bulletin and the GSA Special Papers collection, span the years 2009 to 1954.
Access the literature at: http://www.gsapubs.org/site/misc/Haiti.xhtml.
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The following poster map providing information on the recent earthquake is also freely available from the United States Geological Survey (USGS):
ftp://hazards.cr.usgs.gov/maps/sigeqs/20100112/20100112.pdf

PubMedCentral Canada now available for searching

PubMedCentral Canada is now up and available for searching, at: http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/
PubMed Central Canada is a free digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences literature based on PubMed Central, the archive developed by the US National Library of Medicine. The search interface allows anyone to browse, search and download articles.
PMC Canada will launch a manuscript submission system later this year. It will support CIHR’s Policy on Access to Research Outputs, which requires CIHR grant recipients to make their peer-reviewed publications freely accessible online within six months of publication.
PMC Canada is a partnership between the National Research Council’s Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (NRC-CISTI), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and the US National Library of Medicine (NLM).

Public Domain Day 2010

Every January 1st is celebrated as Public Domain Day, the day when copyright terms expire and works enter the public domain. However, according to the Center for the Study of the Public Domain: “We have little reason to celebrate on Public Domain Day because our public domain has been shrinking, not growing”. See here for the full blog post from the Center with some interesting links.
To find out more about the public domain see James Boyle’s book: The Public Domain – which is available freely online (of course!). Boyle is a law professor at Duke University and the founder of the Center for the Study of the Public Domain.