Surgical Information Site

I recently found a new site called Pre-OP, which describes itself as:
“This is an information resource designed to help you understand the nature of a medical condition and the surgical procedure most commonly used to treat it.
Our hope is that we will help you to:
• gain a better understanding of your medical condition,
• know your treatment options,
• understand the risks of surgery – as well as the risk should you decide not to have the treatment your doctor recommends.
• You should also know what to expect on the day of surgery
• and know how to care of yourself during recovery.”
I think it might also be useful for premed and 1st year students.

School Based Clinics

The Paediatric School-Based Clinics were established in May of 2007, in response to the ‘Health disparity by Neighbourhood Income” study that was published by the SHR (Dr. Mark Lemstra et al). The clinics are a product of the efforts of the Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine at the U of S, the Catholic and Public school Divisions and The Saskatoon Tribal Council, in consultation with the Core Neighbourhood communities to provide access to comprehensive paediatric care.
Acknowledging that it is the social determinants of health such as income, literacy, and housing that impact people’s health, we provide care to children in core neighbourhoods, embracing the community paediatrics model which shifts away from one child but to ‘all children in the community, within the context of the family and the community’. We adhere to the principals of cultural competency.
The clinic is collaborative; i.e. seeking to work across sectors such as Education, Social Services, Justice, Law Enforcement etc; as well as integrated, i.e. working alongside teachers, councilors, social workers psychologists, ENT, Child Psychiatry.
The clinics are currently based out of St. Mary’s Elementary School (Mon/ Tues/ Wed); as well as W.P. Bate Elementary school on Thursday afternoon. It is staffed by 2 Paediatrcians from the department of paediatrics. Appointments are not mandatory, drop-ins are welcomed. A referral by a Family Physician is not required; patients/families/ teachers, etc may all refer. We work with the family and the community, as well as the schools, to make ourselves and the other health-care professionals whom we may refer our patients to, more accessible, recognizing the many obstacles that people who live in poverty, face.
A huge part of our work is dedicated to advocacy; for the patients and for their families.
– Submitted by Dr. Maryam Mehtar

365 Days of Diabetes

Slideshow of Kerri Morrone Sparling’s diabetes 365 project. Diabetes is every day. And in 2008, she had a photo to prove it.
“Over the last 366 days (leap year added the extra challenge), I’ve lived my life with my camera at the ready, snapping photos of everything from CGM sensors to snacks … and the moments in between. I thought that the Diabetes 365 project would make me feel like diabetes is an overwhelming facet of my life, but instead I’ve seen that diabetes truly does not define any of us. We can grab pictures of our meters and our pump sites, but there’s also so much LIFE going on between all these moments of diabetes management.” http://sixuntilme.com/blog2/2009/01/diabetes365.html

Check the Flicker site http://www.flickr.com/photos/sixuntilme/sets/72157603612973464/

Patients Like Me keeps growing

Founded in 2004 by three MIT engineers whose collective experience spans from running the world’s only non-profit biotechnology laboratory to large-scale online commerce applications, PatientsLikeMe is a privately funded company dedicated to making a difference in the lives of patients diagnosed with life-changing diseases. Our personal experiences with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) inspired us to create a community of patients, doctors, and organizations that inspires, informs, and empowers individuals. We’re committed to providing patients with access to the tools, information, and experiences that they need to take control of their disease.
patients-like-me.jpg
Neurological Conditions
MS (Multiple Sclerosis)
Parkinson’s Disease
ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerois) / MND (Motor Neuron Disease)
PLS (Primary Lateral Sclerosis)
PMA (Progressive Muscular Atrophy)
PSP (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy)
CBD (Corticobasal Degeneration)
MSA (Multiple System Atrophy)
Devic’s Neuromyelitis Optica
Neuroendocrine Conditions
Fibromyalgia
Mood Conditions
Depression
Anxiety
Bipolar
OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder)
PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder)
Immune Conditions
HIV/AIDS

Self Management of Chronic Illness

I was at a presentation about Global Alliance for Self Management Support this morning and it reminded me of how important it is to keep up to date with how the online world is changing healthcare.
The Global Alliance for Self Management Support originates in Spain but it has sponsorship world wide including from Canada.

Why patients might want to join

On the GASMS, they teach how to take care of yourself and help others. They believe in the collaborative work of patients, health professionals and institutions to achieve a bottom-up change, through patient-centered care, based in human dignity. You may access information by diseases or browse the projects in development.

Why professionals might want to join

The involvement of health professionals in Self Management Support contributes to evidence-based medicine and to the WHO recommendations on the New Chronic Care Model. It improves the patient-physician relationship and patient and family empowerment. From the GASMS, you may participate in an international network to exchange experiences with other health professionals, attend online virtual conferences, and receive training on Self-Management Support through the web, on demand.
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The idea for this site originated with the Expert Patient Program out of Sanford and New Health Partnerships concepts but Dr. Serrano wanted an opportunity for patients to have a longer term connection.
Family Care

Social Networking for Patients

Whenever I talk about social networking with physicians, my ideas are met with massive scepticism. “Why would we encourage students to participate in such an antisocial medium?” is the most common response. But when I open the topic of people who are isolated in their homes because of personal or family illness, the lights go on in people’s eyes. The following are examples of some of these networks:
Interactive Autism
IAN, the Interactive Autism Network, is an innovative online project designed to accelerate the pace of autism research by linking researchers and families. Anyone impacted by an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can become part of IAN’s online community to stay informed about autism research, provide feedback, and make their voices heard.
Although primarily about research, it provides links to articles, upcoming events, news and discussion opportunities.
My Care Community
My Care Community is for the live-in caregivers of chronically ill people. CareCommunity gives you the following.
* Expert information.
* Access to a community of caregivers.
* A “Personal Community” page to help you share caregiving with friends and family members.
Patients Like Me
Communities for ALS, Hiv, MS, Parkinson’s and mood disorders. Founded in 2004 by three MIT engineers whose collective experience spans from running the world’s only non-profit biotechnology laboratory to large-scale online commerce applications, PatientsLikeMe is a privately funded company dedicated to making a difference in the lives of patients diagnosed with life-changing diseases. Our personal experiences with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) inspired us to create a community of patients, doctors, and organizations that inspires, informs, and empowers individuals. We’re committed to providing patients with access to the tools, information, and experiences that they need to take control of their disease.
Webtribes
Webtribe is a network of communities that include addictions, anxiety, depression, hiv/aids and ocd.
The Wellness Community
Cancer support, education and hope for patients and families.
Group Loop
This is a safe place for teens with cancer that is a subgroup of the wellness community.
Starbright World
A site for chronically ill, hospitalized teens setup by the Starlight Foundation. The Toronto Hospital for Sick Children is a participant.
The network offers videoconferencing, private and secure access to almost 600 web sites, 150 games and activities, chat rooms, bulletin boards, e-mail and instant messaging.
The “Find A Friend” program lets children search for other kids with similar interests, hobbies and illnesses. They can even search specifically for a certain age range. The feature encourages kids to communicate and socialize with each other.
A study conducted at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York found that children experienced less pain and anxiety while engaged in Starbright World than when engaged in other recreational activities.

Death of a child from AIDS

“Tonn” is a video about the death of a orphan in a hospice for terminal HIV patients in Thailand. This movie realized by the doctor of that hospice, is a way to pay homage to the child and to promote the wearing of condoms.
Images and topic are very graphic. View with caution.

Companion video that tells a spouse story is available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnUcB-yI500and the story of two young people going for testing is here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUE4KMMqyHE