Trends in learning

Some significant trends in learning:

  • Many learners will move into a variety of different, possibly unrelated
    fields over the course of their lifetime.
  • Informal learning is a significant aspect of our learning experience.
    Formal education no longer comprises the majority of our learning. Learning
    now occurs in a variety of ways – through communities of practice,
    personal networks, and through completion of work-related tasks.
  • Learning is a continual process, lasting for a lifetime. Learning
    and work related activities are no longer separate. In many situations,
    they are the same.
  • Technology is altering (rewiring) our brains. The tools we use define
    and shape our thinking.
  • The organization and the individual are both learning organisms.
    Increased attention to knowledge management highlights the need for
    a theory that attempts to explain the link between individual and organizational
    learning.
  • Many of the processes previously handled by learning theories (especially
    in cognitive information processing) can now be off-loaded to, or supported
    by, technology.
  • Know-how and know-what is being supplemented with know-where (the
    understanding of where to find knowledge needed).

from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm

Congratulations Dr. Rajput

Dr. Ali Rajput, world-class researcher and professor emeritus of neurology was named 2006 Saskatoon Citizen of the Year by CTV. Dr. Rajput has spend the last 40 years in Saskatoon researching movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and was responsible for the creation of the Saskatchewan Centre for Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders at Royal University Hospital. Rajput is also credited with inspiring the Kinsmen Foundation to create the Telemiracle fundraiser for Saskatchewan people with disabilities.
His past awards include a Saskatchewan Centennial Medal, a University of Saskatchewan Distinguished Researcher Award and the Saskatchewan Order of Merit. In 1997, he was made an officer of the Order of Canada. The Saskatchewan Medical Association also crowned him doctor of the year for 2006.