U of S receives Picassos from Alumnus Dr. Frederick Mulder


Last night, U of S alumnus Dr. Frederick Mulder (BA’64) announced his donation of six Picasso prints to the University of Saskatchewan’s art collection.

Mulder was delivering a public lecture on the U of S campus about his journey from the prairies to the world of Picasso at the time he announced the donation.

“Picasso was one of the world’s great artists, and it’s been a wonderful, strange journey from a small prairie town to dealing in his work, meeting his family and his printers, and now bringing his work to the University of Saskatchewan,” said Mulder.

Five of the prints were donated in honour of Saskatchewan people who are significant to Dr. Mulder: Professor Emeritus Rudy Krutzen, the U of S professor whom Dr. Mulder credits with “turning him on to Philosophy”; photographer Courtney Milne whom Dr. Mulder met as a student at the U of S; Professor Emeritus Don Kerr, Dr. Mulder’s first U of S professor; and Peter Millard, a fellow U of S alumnus who met Dr. Mulder at Oxford and influenced his career in art. Dr. Mulder also donated a piece to honour President Peter MacKinnon.

“We are delighted to be the recipient of these generous contributions to the University Art Collection. These important prints created by arguably the most influential artist of the 20th century, will make a significant impact on our current holdings in this oeuvre. This is another fine example of Dr. Mulder’s extensive work as a donor and philanthropist that has touched so many,” said Kent Archer, Director of the University’s Art Collection.

Frederick Mulder was educated as a philosopher at the University of Saskatchewan, Brown University, and Oxford University. On the completion of his doctorate at Oxford, his intention was to return to Canada, but instead he stayed on in London and started a business dealing in original prints.

Dr. Mulder is one of the world’s leading dealers in Picasso’s printmaking and his clients include most of the world’s major museums. He lives and works in London and is known across Britain not only for his artistic expertise but also for his personal philanthropy as well as the promotion of giving collectively.


Watch Frederick Mulder’s lecture and donation announcement:

Names of Picasso Prints donated to the University of Saskatchewan from Dr. Frederick Mulder:
o Exposition Vallauris (1952)
o Exposition Vallauris (1955)
o Exposition de Vallauris (1955)
o Avant la Pique. II (1959)
o Nature Morte au Casse-Croûte. II (1962)
o Tête de Bouffon. Carnaval (1965)


Dr. Frederick Mulder: Biography

Frederick Mulder has been a private art dealer since 1971 in London dealing in original prints from the fifteenth to twentieth centuries. He deals in a wide range of prints but his specialty is Picasso and in particular the linocuts he made between 1951 and 1965. His firm’s holdings of Picasso’s linocuts are among the most extensive in the world. Dr. Mulder is considered to be one of the world’s experts in the field of nineteenth and twentieth century European prints. His clients include many of the world’s major museums: the Metropolitan Museum and the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington; the Art Institute of Chicago; the National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo; the Art Gallery of Ontario; the Australian National Gallery, Canberra; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; the British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh; and the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

Frederick Mulder was educated as a philosopher at the University of Saskatchewan, Brown University, and Oxford University. On his completion of his doctorate at Oxford, his intention was to return to Canada, but instead he stayed on in London and started a business dealing in original prints. The business went well, but, he has explained, ‘while I loved the business, I was also aware that the world had many injustices, and I developed the habit of tithing to projects that addressed these issues’. Dr. Mulder has used much of his income as an art dealer for the good of others, giving to charity in a range of unusual ways and persuading other individuals to give their money to charity and to enjoy it. He has said that ‘Giving money is one of the few things people do alone. We work together, eat together, dance together, and I’ve discovered that giving with others is more interesting, more satisfying, and probably more competent, if it is done in the company of other people. The money also seems to go further! That’s why I’ve helped to set up structures in which people can give together and learn from each other.’

Given these values, it makes sense that Frederick Mulder would be a leader in the field of philanthropy. He is thus the Chair of Prairie Trust, a charitable organization funded from his business, a founding member of the Network for Social Change, and the founding Chair of The Funding Network, an informal group, open to all, of over a hundred individual and corporate donors that meets quarterly in London and elsewhere to support a wide range of causes for social change. He was the winner of a Beacon Fellowship Special Judges’ Prize in 2004 for his contribution to pioneering, innovative approaches in the field of philanthropy and he was made a CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) by the Queen in the New Year Honours 2012.

(Sources: frederickmulder.com, coutts.com, philanthropyuk.org, beaconfellowship.org.uk)