Article – B.C. Flooding: Scenes of Suffering and Solidarity, As Climate Experts Warned of Bigger Picture

B.C. Flooding: Scenes of Suffering and Solidarity, As Climate Experts Warned of Bigger Picture

Gaye Taylor
The Energy Mix
December 20, 2021

November 25, 2021: Heartbreak and heroism were everywhere in the unfolding story of the British Columbia floods, while those watching from near and far warned any policy-makers and public still unconvinced of the need for rapid, concerted climate action to think again, and quickly.

Read the full article here: https://www.theenergymix.com/2021/12/20/b-c-flooding-scenes-of-suffering-and-solidarity-as-climate-experts-warned-of-bigger-picture/

Article – Anxious about climate change? Here’s what you need to know about ‘ecological grief’

Anxious about climate change? Here’s what you need to know about ‘ecological grief’

Kamyar Razavi
Global News
November 19, 2021

The effects of severe weather and climate change are becoming impossible to ignore, and that’s leading to feelings of ‘ecological grief’

Read the full article here: https://globalnews.ca/news/8380734/climate-change-anxiety/

Article – Making the promised Canada Water Agency a reality

Making the promised Canada Water Agency a reality

 Corinne Schuster-Wallace, Robert (Bob) Sandford
IRPP Policy Options
September 13, 2021

Water has been an issue even in a pandemic, with drought, floods and lack of access. A commitment to freshwater management that values water is key.

See the article here: https://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/septembe-2021/making-the-promised-canada-water-agency-a-reality/

News Video – “Horrific:” Scientists warn glaciers in Canadian Rockies are melting at unprecedented rate

“Horrific:” Scientists warn glaciers in Canadian Rockies are melting at unprecedented rate

The Global Herald
August 31, 2021

A summer of unprecedented heat has not been kind to the iconic ice in the Canadian Rockies. According to researchers, glaciers are melting at a rate never seen before.

See the article here: https://theglobalherald.com/news/horrific-scientists-warn-glaciers-in-canadian-rockies-are-melting-at-unprecedented-rate/

News Interviews – Drought, Climate Change and Agriculture

Farmers and Climate

David Gray (Host)
CBC Radio, Calgary Eyeopener
August 25, 2021

Listen here: https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-5-calgary-eyeopener/clip/15862522-farmers-climate


Farmers innovating to save their fields

Mark Connolly (Host)
CBC Radio, Edmonton AM
August 25, 2021

Listen here: https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-17-edmonton-am/clip/15862483-farmers-innovating-save-fields


Extreme conditions will only continue, the agriculture sector is racing to find solutions

Julianne Hazelwood (Host)
CBC Radio, Ontario Morning
August 25, 2021

Listen here: https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-112-ontario-morning-from-cbc-radio/clip/15862465-ontario-morning-wednesday-august-25-2021-


 

News Article – ‘Sink into the dry as dust soil’: What historic droughts mean for today

‘Sink into the dry as dust soil’: What historic droughts mean for today

Nick Pearce
The Star Phoenix
July 31, 2021

In 1961, Prairie farmers weren’t facing the current drought so much as reliving ones past.

Read the article here: https://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/sink-into-the-dry-as-dust-soil-what-historic-droughts-mean-for-today

Global News – Alberta Flood Season

Snowpack is above average for Bow River Basin as Alberta flood season begins

Sarah Offin, Global News Calgary
May 12, 2021

Snowpack isn’t a predictor for floods, but it is a factor and it is above average in the headwaters of the Bow River basin this year.

April measurements from Alberta Environment and Parks in the Bow River Basin vary, from as low as six per cent above average to locations nearing record highs of 87 per cent above average. Mountain snow overall in the basin is 27 per cent above average.

Read the full article and watch the video here.

New journal publication – SPADE

Meteorological observations collected during the Storms and Precipitation Across the continental Divide Experiment (SPADE), April–June 2019

J.M. Thériault, S.J. Déry, J.W. Pomeroy, H.M. Smith, J. Almonte, A. Bertoncini, R.W. Crawford, A. Desroches-Lapointe, M. Lachapelle, Z. Mariani, S. Mitchell, J.E. Morris, C. Hébert-Pinard, P. Rodriguez, and H.D. Thompson

Earth System Science Data, Volume 13, Issue 3
March 24, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-13-1233-2021

Abstract:
The continental divide along the spine of the Canadian Rockies in southwestern Canada is a critical headwater region for hydrological drainages to the Pacific, Arctic, and Atlantic oceans. Major flooding events are typically attributed to heavy precipitation on its eastern side due to upslope (easterly) flows. Precipitation can also occur on the western side of the divide when moisture originating from the Pacific Ocean encounters the west-facing slopes of the Canadian Rockies. Often, storms propagating across the divide result in significant precipitation on both sides. Meteorological data over this critical region are sparse, with few stations located at high elevations. Given the importance of all these types of events, the Storms and Precipitation Across the continental Divide Experiment (SPADE) was initiated to enhance our knowledge of the atmospheric processes leading to storms and precipitation on either side of the continental divide. This was accomplished by installing specialized meteorological instrumentation on both sides of the continental divide and carrying out manual observations during an intensive field campaign from 24 April–26 June 2019. On the eastern side, there were two field sites: (i) at Fortress Mountain Powerline (2076 m a.s.l.) and (ii) at Fortress Junction Service, located in a high-elevation valley (1580 m a.s.l.). On the western side, Nipika Mountain Resort, also located in a valley (1087 m a.s.l.), was chosen as a field site. Various meteorological instruments were deployed including two Doppler light detection and ranging instruments (lidars), three vertically pointing micro rain radars, and three optical disdrometers. The three main sites were nearly identically instrumented, and observers were on site at Fortress Mountain Powerline and Nipika Mountain Resort during precipitation events to take manual observations of precipitation type and microphotographs of solid particles. The objective of the field campaign was to gather high-temporal-frequency meteorological data and to compare the different conditions on either side of the divide to study the precipitation processes that can lead to catastrophic flooding in the region. Details on field sites, instrumentation used, and collection methods are discussed. Data from the study are publicly accessible from the Federated Research Data Repository at https://doi.org/10.20383/101.0221 (Thériault et al., 2020). This dataset will be used to study atmospheric conditions associated with precipitation events documented simultaneously on either side of a continental divide. This paper also provides a sample of the data gathered during a precipitation event.

Read more here.

Canadia Water Agency National Webinar

International Opportunities and Responsibilities for the Canada Water Agency

March 8, 2021

You are invited to GWF’s next in the national virtual engagement series on how the Canada Water Agency can deliver water security for Canadians. International Opportunities and Responsibilities for the Canada Water Agency is a 90-minute national webinar that will include perspectives from GWF water and climate scientists, the private sector, and international experts.

The webinar will feature Dr. Shamila Nair-Bedoulle, Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences at UNESCO, on how Canada can strengthen its role at the UN. Tom Axworthy will lead a panel of guests who will discuss how a modern and leading Canada Water Agency can support Canadian business growth overseas and provide opportunities to meet international development responsibilities.

For more information and to register, go to: https://gwf.usask.ca/events/2021/03/international-opportunities-and-responsibilities-for-the-canada-water-agency.php?mc_cid=646eb66988&mc_eid=d4a759d0c9