A river ran through it

ALONG THIS STRETCH OF ALASKA HIGHWAY, where it curves between the southern edge of Lhù’ààn Män lake and the rugged peaks of the southwest Yukon, the dust storms can blow so thick that drivers have been forced to pull over. Where the two-lane road crosses A´ąy Chù river, sand drifts across the pavement as if it were snow.

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Spring snowpack a tale of two worlds

BOW VALLEY – In the Rockies, the story of the late spring/early summer snowpack is a tale of two worlds.

In the lower elevations and the valley bottoms, the snow melted away early, while in the higher elevations it has only just begun to melt.

“There’s still lots of snow up high, but not much down low,” said snow hydrologist John Pomeroy, director of the University of Saskatchewan’s Centre for Hydrology which conducts much of its research in the Rockies.

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Canada is the only G7 country without a national flood forecasting system. Experts say there’s a cost to that

Canada is the only G7 country without a nationwide flood forecasting system and, according to scientists, the absence of such a system has come at a cost.

“Damages from floods and droughts have shot through the roof,” said John Pomeroy, an expert in hydrology and the Canada Research Chair in Water Resources and Climate Change at the University of Saskatchewan.

According to Pomeroy, the total amount of money spent recovering from climate-related floods and wildfires in Canada prior to the year 2000 was about $1 billion.

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Weather system becoming unhinged due to climate change, U of S expert says

Environment and Climate Change Canada this week released a report showing Canada is warming up twice as fast as the rest of the world. CTV Morning Live host Jeremy Dodge spoke with John Pomeroy, director of the Global Waters Initiative at the University of Saskatchewan, to get his thoughts on how the warming trend could change life in Saskatchewan.

Watch the full interview here.

USask study says more snow, earlier melt will challenge Arctic communities in future

Centre for Hydrology Director, John Pomeroy (left) and past student Sebastian Krogh (right).

University of Saskatchewan researchers with the Global Water Futures (GWF) program have provided the first detailed projections of major water challenges facing Western Arctic communities such as Inuvik and transportation corridors such as the Dempster Highway by the end of this century.

“There will be a tipping point reached over the next few decades, putting at risk communities whose infrastructure was designed for 20th century climate and hydrology,” said Dr. John Pomeroy (PhD), senior author of a recent paper in the American Meteorological Society’s prestigious Journal of Hydrometeorology.

“Humanity has to act quickly and decisively to avert such a future, and that will involve reducing greenhouse gas concentrations and improving infrastructure to better withstand the extreme events that are coming,” said Pomeroy, director of the USask Centre for Hydrology and director of the USask-led GWF, the largest freshwater research program in the world.

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Centre for Hydrology student wins Cryosphere Student Innovation Award from AGU at the Washington DC Fall Meeting

Congratulations to Caroline Aubry-Wake who won a Cryosphere Student Innovation Award from the American Geophysical Union at its Fall Meeting in Washington DC last week. The $1000 USD prize was for her proposal of an innovative method to determine debris cover thickness on glaciers. Great work Caroline!

Caroline Aubry-Wake, the winner of the Cryosphere Student Innovation Award, conducting fieldwork.