7 Cs of Communication

Brette D. W. KristoffGraduate Student, Communications Specialist, GMCTL  February 24th 2021

“How often do you communicate with people during your day? How clear is your communication? This article, published on Mind Tools, shares seven Cs of communication to ensure you’re communicating in the most clear and effective way possible.” Education Executive, June 28th, 2017

Step-up your written communication game with these 7 tips, adapted for USask Student Canvas Users! 

Photo by David Roberts, May 18, 2016, CC by 2.0

The Education Executive (UK) quoted above, used the 7 Cs of Communication from Mind Tools as a checklist for ensuring maximum efficiency and clarity in your writing.

Not only did I find this list straight-forward, the 7 Cs of Communication can be applied to any style of writing or communication. Whether it be email, Canvas discussions, or even your essay writing, the 7 Cs of Communication will enhance the clarity and efficiency of your writing. 

I read the article (so you don’t have to) and summarized the 7 Cs with some examples specifically for USask Student Canvas Users

What are the 7 Cs of Communication?

Remember these 7 Cs when you’re expressing your ideas in emails, discussion posts, or term papers. Your communication/writing should be:

1. Clear: Be clear about the goal or purpose of what you are trying to communicate.

  • Whether you’re writing a paper, responding to a discussion post, or sending a risky text, be as crystal clear as you can be in your intent. 
  • Be assertive but not aggressive, and AVOID passive-aggressive language at all costs. 
  • Use direct examples when appropriate, and a mix of simple/complex sentences ordered in a logical format. 

2. Concise: Stick to the point and keep it brief.

  • Are there filler words that can be deleted? Have you repeated the same idea more than once just in slightly different phrasing?
  • The article says: 
    • Eliminate and avoid using cliches and sayings such as, “for instance,” “you see,” “literally,” “basically,” “i mean,”… 

3. Concrete:

  • “When your message is concrete, then your audience has a clear picture of what you’re telling them.
  • There are details (but not too many!) and vivid facts, and there’s laser-like focus. Your message is solid.”

4. Correct/Credible: Your information should be audience appropriate and error free. 

  • Your aim should always be to facilitate accurate and relevant information. 
  • Provide proper references for any information that is not your own. Provide external links when appropriate.
  • Technical terms should be clearly explained (and audience appropriate!)
  • Names, titles, and other proper nouns are correctly spelled. Remember that spell check isn’t flawless, and especially sucks at grammar. Sorry Spell Check.  

5. Coherent/Creative: Your information should be ordered logically and express thoughtful ideas. 

  • All of your points must be relevant and related to the main topic.
  • Tone and flow should be consistent. Read your work aloud or to a friend to hear how it sounds. 
  • Be thoughtful, consider different opinions other than your own. Be considerate of what other people might be experiencing, too. 

6. Complete: 

    • Have you included all the necessary information? This includes things like the date, time, location, your information, acknowledging specific questions, or responding to previous correspondence etc. and so on. 
    • When writing an academic paper or assignment, review the requirements for the assignment and ensure you have met each one. 
      • Review your Canvas Course Syllabus

 

 

7. Courteous: “Courteous communication is friendly, open, and honest.”

  • The article reminds us to keep the reader’s viewpoint in mind, be empathetic, and to consider different opinions other than just your own.

Our ability to communicate effectively is essential. Everyday we share thoughts, ideas, stories, and information with others. Does what you’re trying to say meet the all 7 Cs of Communication?

                  – Content quoted and adapted from EdExec – 7 Cs of Communication

How can we use these 7 Cs in Canvas? 

  • Remember the 7 Cs of Communication in any setting, to better express your ideas and opinions!
  • Canvas has multiple communication channels which makes interacting with classmates and instructors easier. Offering various ways to collaborate and participate, Canvas Chats, Discussions, and Groups can be used to enhance your  virtual classroom setting. Use the Inbox for internal messaging.
  • Review our Canvas Student Tips posts on using Canvas Discussions and Canvas Groups.

Writing Help

  • USask Students have access  to many services, including the Library Writing Centre, tutoring, and academic writing workshops. 

 

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6, traditional Nehiyaw territory, and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another. 

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

Using the Canvas Student App

Checking out the Canvas app - Photo by K. D. W. Kristoff, CC by 2.0

Checking out the Canvas app – Photo by K. D. W. Kristoff, CC by 2.0

 

Download the Canvas Student App on your iPhone (IOS) or Android for easy access to your course content, calendars, and chats.

 

Brette D. W. KristoffGraduate Student, Communications Specialist, GMCTL, February 8th, 2021

 

Use the Canvas app to take your coursework on the go with you. If you have reading assignments, group work, or Inbox messages to respond to, the Canvas Student App is easy to use from wherever you are. 

Canvas Student IOS Guide:

  • Search and Download the Canvas Student app for iOS from your app store.
  • Open the app, and select the  U of S as your institution. Then, login using your NSID and password.
  • Check out the full Canvas Student Guide for IPhone for further instructions.

Canvas Student Android Guide:

  • Search and Download the Canvas Student app for Android from your Play Store. 
  • Open the app and select the U of S as your institution. Then, login using your NSID and password.
  • Check out the full Canvas Student Guide for Android for further instructions.

Getting Started with the App: 

By default, the app takes you to your Canvas Dashboard where you can access your courses and favorite groups from your mobile phone.

  • Customize your app landing page and other app features in your User Menu, located at the top left corner of the App.
  • The App looks similar to the desktop version with access to pretty much all the same stuff!
  • Remember, it is not recommended that you use the mobile version of Canvas to take quizzes and exams. 

How do I find my User Menu?

  • At the top left corner of the app Dashboard, is your User Menu.
  • Here is where you can find your settings and help features, there you will find your Files folder.
  • For both IOS and Android, access mobile Help options from the User Menu. 

 

How do I manage my email and push notifications for the App?

  • Find the Settings tab in your User Menu.
  • Enable your notification preferences to get important reminders, calendar updates, Inbox notifications and more.

 

 

 

 

Where do I access my Course content in the App?

  • From your Dashboard, select the course you want to access. This will take you to the Course Home page just like in the desktop version.
  •  Click on the title of the course you want to access to find your Modules, Files, People, Grades, and everything else.

What else is cool about the app?

  1. Use the document scanner in the app to easily scan and upload Files and Assignments.
  2. Bookmark pages on the app for quick reference later:
    • If you’re using the app to catch up on your course Reading Assignments, select the bookmark option from the drop-down menu at the top right corner.
    • Your saved bookmarks can be found for quick reference in your User Menu.

Remember: Use the Student App for anything except Canvas quizzes and exams. It is not recommended you take quizzes on your mobile device and “remotely proctored” exams will only work on your laptop or desktop computer.

_____________________________________________________________________

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another. 

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

Groups in Canvas

Teamwork makes the dream work.

Tribute to Youth, bronze sculpture, 1998 by A. Epp – Photo by B. D. W. Kristoff, CC by 2.0

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate StudentCommunications Specialist, GMCTL,        Feb.1, 2021

In your Canvas courses, instructors may have you work in groups for different assignments and tasks.

1) How do I find my group?                                                                                          Click on the Groups icon from your Global Navigation Menu to view the groups you are a member of. Select the name of the group to access the Group Homepage.

2) What is a Group Homepage?                                                                                       Each group has its own Homepage with a variety of tools for collaborating on assignments, presentations, and projects. From the Homepage you can review the most Recent Activity within the group, or view/create group Announcements.

  • Only members belonging to the group (and your instructors and TAs) have access to the Groups Homepage and content. 
  •  To see who else is in the group, select the People tab.

3) What are Discussions and Collaborations used for?                                               From your Group Homepage, you can also access Discussions, Collaborations, and Files that your instructor may have set up for your group. 

  • Discussions allow you to participate in group conversations and discussions. Create a new discussion topic for your group by clicking the ‘Add Discussion’ button.
  • Remember that all group members have access to all group Discussions. To send a private message to a classmate or to your instructor, use the Canvas Inbox tool. 
  • Collaborations allow you to create shared documents with group members. 
  • Files will store all uploaded group content. Use the ‘Upload’ button to share documents and files for other group members to access. 

4) How do I view my group’s Calendar?                                                                There are two ways to view your can view your groups’ Calendars: 

Option 1: From your group Home Page, select the View Calendar link on the right side of the Home Page.

Option 2: From your Global Navigation menu, open the Calendar tab, accessible wherever you are in Canvas. The names of your Groups will be listed on the right side of the page under CALENDARS, at the bottom of the list. Each group needs to have a coloured square beside it, to be visible in the Calendar.

 

 

5) How do I join a ‘self sign-up’ group?                                                                 There may be a course requirement to join a ‘self sign-up’ group and participate in discussions and activities:

To join an available group, go to the People tab in your course, open the Groups tab. All available groups for this Course will be listed here. 

  • To join a group, click Join to open the group and add your name.
  • You may be able to ‘Leave’ to switch to a different group. Review the requirements for ‘self sign-up’ groups in your Course syllabus. 

6) How do I communicate with my group?                                                                Within Canvas there are several options for communicating with group members:

Option 1: Use the Canvas Inbox tool. The Inbox create a list of your groups so you can easily message all group members; or select individual group members or classmates from the drop-down ‘To” menu when sending a message.                              Option 2: Start a new Discussion topic or contribution to on-going topics in the group Discussion tab. Remember all group members and instructors can access Discussions.                                                              Option 3: Your Course Chat allows you to DM (direct message) your groups members in a quick and casual way.                                                                          Option 4: From your group Homepage, you can add an Announcement to create Calendar events, messages, updates, or reminders for your group. 

 

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another. 

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

Using MEETS in Canvas

‘Meeting up’ might look a little different this year . . .

        Use MEETS in Canvas to attend and manage your online meeting spaces . . .             All your class meetings in Canvas, all in one place!

Same, same, but different: USask roommates take a needed coffee break. – Photo by B. D. W. Kristoff, CC by 2.0

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate Student – Communications Specialist, GMCTL, January 26th, 2021

What is MEETS?

Canvas uses MEETS to host and manage WebEx virtual classrooms and online meeting spaces. 

    • Canvas course lectures may be hosted and scheduled through the MEETS tool in Canvas.
    • Join events in MEETS for video conferencing or for scheduling meetings with your instructors.  

Here are a few other things we think you should know about using MEETS with Canvas:

  • The first time you use MEETS you may be prompted to install:
    • WebEx Desktop App or Desktop Extension/Add-on for your browser
    • Install the Webex app for your mobile device. 

Tip!  Google Chrome seems to be the quickest for using/installing the add-on. Make you do this before your first scheduled MEET. 

How do I attend a scheduled session?

  1. Once you’ve logged into your Canvas Course, the MEETS tab is accessible from your Course menu.
  2. Upcoming sessions will be listed under the Event Calendar tab at the top of the screen.
  3. Under Events, select the event titled in blue font, and click the orange Join button, just before the event/meeting/class starts.

Sign-up for Office Hours/One-on-One Appointments:

Book Appointments with your instructors or view office hour availability using MEETS:

1. Select Appointment Booking.            2. Choose “Book appointment with” from the drop down menu if there are multiple instructors in your course.

3. Select a time slot marked “Available.”

4. Next, fill in the necessary information to Reserve Appointment. Best to add your name into the Appointment Topic text box.

5. You will then receive an email confirmation. When it’s time for your appointment, click Join under Events in your MEETS page. The appointment is exclusive to you and no other student has access to join the appointment during the time slot.

Accessing Recorded Sessions: 

  • Access previously recorded sessions from the Event Recordings tab on your MEETS homepage: 
  • Here you’ll find a list of recorded content. Select View Recordings to watch. You can stream or download the recordings.

We’d like to thank Carmen Harder, ICT Support Services, Training Specialist for her help in writing this blog!

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another. 

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

Planning your Term with Canvas: Getting Started

An icy view, somewhere in Saskatoon. Photo by Marina Moreland, CC by 2.0

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate Student – Communications Specialist, GMCTL, January 20th, 2021

Here are some ways to stay on track from the beginning of term.

Using your Canvas Calendar

View your Canvas Calendar from your Global Navigation menu:

  • Each calendar view will list your upcoming due dates and assignments (as soon as your instructor updates or adds content to the course schedule). 
  • View the calendar in Week, Month, or Agenda format by using the selection menu in the navigation bar. Add Calendar items as they come up throughout the term.

  • Ensure all calendars for all your classes are selected – meaning the coloured box is showing next to each class title, so all due dates/events show in your Calendar
  • Take some time to view your calendar and make note of upcoming To-Do’s and assignments. Stay on top and on track by making regular check-ins with your Canvas Calendar.

Ways to Contact Your Instructor in Canvas

There are two main ways to contact your instructor in Canvas:

1. Send a message through your Inbox

  • Your Canvas Inbox is a messaging tool (instead of email) used to communicate within a specific course, to an individual student or instructor, or to a group of students. 
  • Open your Canvas Inbox from your Global Navigation Menu. 
  • Select the drop down menu to choose your course and instructor you wish to message. 
  • Filter your messages by Inbox, Unread, Starred, Sent, Archived, or view Submission Comments. 
  • Your Canvas Inbox allows for simple and private space for conversations with your instructors and peers. Remember to always start any online communication with a formal greeting and goodbye; use proper spelling and grammar; and remember to clearly state your objective/question. 

2. Use the Help option to Ask Your Instructor a Question. 

  • Locate your Help tab at the bottom of your Global Navigation Menu and select the appropriate course and instructor.
  • Check out the other Help resources linked in the Help menu.

Other Student Resources

  • As a USask student you have access to free online Student Learning Services  including academic writing resources, math & stats helps, and other tutoring services.
  • For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another. 

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

A new year.

Hello 2021. Thank goodness you’re here.

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate Student – Communications Specialist, GMCTL, January 11th, 2021

A new year, a new term, a fresh start. 

Canvas is our new Usask learning management system (LMS). Over the last two years, USask has been on track to phase out the old system, Blackboard, and replace it with the much more efficient and user-friendly system, Canvas. 

We know change is difficult, so we’ve created the Canvas Tips for Students blog to help students get to know Canvas and learn some useful info to use this new learning management system. 

Remote learning isn’t easy, but Canvas has some pretty cool features that will help simplify learning at home. My favourite things about Canvas’ user-friendly interface so far, are:

Stay tuned in coming weeks for more Canvas Tips or browse our archived posts.  Happy Studying!

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another.

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

Viewing Rubrics and Grades in Canvas

Seasonal message @sparrowcoffee, Photo by B. D. W. Kristoff, CC by 2.0

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate Student – Communications Specialist, GMCTL, December 15, 2020

View Rubrics for Assignments: 

  • Your instructors might include a grading rubric for assignments. You should review the rubric’s criteria and ratings before submitting your assignment to ensure you meet all of the requirements. 
    • A Canvas Rubric appears immediately below your assignment details
    • The Rubric lists the different criteria for how your instructor will grade the assignment. Click on the criteria to view longer descriptions, if available.
      • Depending on how your instructor set it up, your rubric may or may not show the point values for each set of criteria. 
    • Total Points for the assignment will be indicated at the bottom of the Rubric.
      • Note not all instructors will use rubrics!

How to view your Grades and Graded Rubrics in Canvas:

Open the Grades tab from your Course Navigation Menu:

  • Select the assignment title to view the assignment details. Here you can view the assignment due date, grade status, and the total point value for each assignment. 
  • You can also view any comments left by your instructor.
  • Use the drop-down menu to view your grades in each of your Canvas courses. Select the Arrange By menu to sort grades by module, due date, or assignment group. 

To see the Rubric results for a submitted assignment, click on the Rubric icon (circled below), to the right of the assignment title to show the details:

The Rubric with ratings will be marked by colours, with the points at the end of each row and an overall total at the bottom.

View Rubrics for Graded Discussions:

  • Discussions in Canvas might be marked and graded as part of your overall course mark. 
  • On a Discussions page, select the title of the graded discussion post.
    • Select the Options icon [1] and then select Show Rubric [2] to review the rubric criteria. 
      • If a Show Rubric icon is not displayed, then there is no Canvas Rubric attached to the discussion. 
    • Click on the rubric criteria to view longer descriptions.
  •  Review the rubric to self-evaluate and make sure your discussion post meets the criteria and course outcomes. 
  • Your graded Canvas Rubric is accessed through your Grades page, in the same way as with an Assignment.

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another.

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

Study Smart with Canvas

Tara Million, Ph.D Student, Indigenous Studies – Photo by Julia Million, CC by 2.0

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate Student – Communications Specialist, GMCTL, December 11, 2020

Even the very idea of final exam season is enough to raise a students’ blood pressure! But don’t sweat it…sometimes, opening your books is the hardest part! Study smarter, not harder, with these Canvas Study Tips.

Some USask Study Tips:

  1. Focus on the process, not the outcome. Start by simply immersing yourself in your Canvas course content. Once you’re more familiar, it won’t feel so scary!
  2. Engage in Active Studying. Simply reading and rereading your notes is not studying. Reading and review are important “pre-studying” steps, but you must also actively engage with the material. You also need to connect and give meaning to what you are reading. Here are some active studying tips we like:
    1. Take notes when reading or watching lectures. 
    2. Create concept maps, or other visual aids to help your brain make sense of all the information.
    3. Use a story, an acronym, or a rhyme to help retain names, dates, and ideas. 
  3. Take time for you.
    1. Schedule regular study breaks which includes getting outside, being physically active, and remembering to eat. 
    2. Take some time to call or connect with your loved ones. 
    3. Review these USask remote learning studying tips

Review Canvas Course Content and Panopto Lectures: 

A good place to begin when preparing for final exams is to review the course syllabus before studying. Yes…dust off that old thing and review the course outline, chapter titles, and the course outcomes as described by the instructor at the beginning of the term. Then, go back and highlight the areas most relevant for the final exam: 

  • Questions you might ask yourself include: What topics will be covered on the final exam? Of these topics, which ones do I feel most competent in and which areas or chapters do I feel the least confident in?

Tips for Avoiding Procrastination

  1. Plan out your exam schedule, and pencil in study time. This will help you develop a more accurate plan of how much time you have to prepare for each exam. Creating and committing to a study schedule is a good way to stay organized and be more prepared!
  2. Set time-limits on your social media apps, or keep your mobile phone in a different room while studying to limit distractions. Dividing your study time into reasonable chunks is a good stratgey. Set an alarm for 20-30 minutes and leave your phone in the other room. When the time is up, you can get up and stretch and have a bathroom break, and then set the alarm again. 
  3. Keep your internet tabs limited and organized by using a different window for each of your courses.  Keep related tabs open, close all the rest.

Be Prepared for a Different Experience

   Exams in Canvas will need new strategies.

  1. If this is the first time you’re doing an exam in Canvas Quizzes (or Canvas New Quizzes), know that the quiz tool can be set up to show only one question at a time and prevent you from returning to a previous question. So the exam-taking strategies you used in the past (like looking over the whole exam first, and planning your time and order of doing questions), might not apply for this kind of exam, so you’ll need to be flexible and ‘go with’ the situation.
  2. If you can go back to other questions, look for the question name in the right sidebar, if your quiz looks like this.
  3. You can click the flag next to a question name/number as a reminder to go back to that question. The flag then appears beside the question name in the righ sidebar. . 
  4. Or if your quiz is like the one below, click on the pin icon [1] to bold it, marking that question for review later, and click on the Question Navigator arrow [2], to reveal previous question details.
  5. Collapse the Question Navigator again with the same arrow.
  6.  Watch the “Time Elapsed” or “Time Remaining” below the questions list in the right- hand sidebar to track your time, shown below,          or top – middle for New Quizzes.

 

 

Good luck on all your finals!

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another.

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

Student Guide for Canvas Discussions

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate Student – Communications Specialist, GMCTL, December 2, 2020

Evhan Kristoff, Art History Major Photo credit – B. Kristoff

 

Whether it be email, instant messaging, or online forums like Canvas Discussions, online communication is our primary mode of communication these days. It’s important to get a handle on how to communicate effectively online.

 

Here’s a Student Guide for Using Discussions in Canvas: 

 

 

What are Canvas Discussions?

Discussions are specific to each Canvas course and function as online workspaces for large or small group communication. The Discussions tool might also be used for general classroom communication.

  • Ask a course related question or participate in ongoing Discussions threads. 
  • Smaller groups might be determined by your instructor OR there might be a self sign-up option. 

Using Discussions in Canvas may be a part of your course requirements.

  • Check your Course Syllabus to see what the course requirements for Discussions are. 

Each of your Discussion Groups will have a Group Homepage as shown below:

  • Here, you can access all your group members’ contributions with that group.

How do I use Canvas Discussions?

1. Open the appropriate Discussion:

  • You may have to post initially before being able to see others’ posts. 
  • Read through the threads to see all the conversations happening.

2. When you want to make a contribution, start your discussion drafts on a Word.doc. After you’ve proofread your draft, copy/paste it directly to the discussion forum. This way you’ll have all your written discussion contributions in one place for later reference. 

  • Within a discussion you can reply directly to an individual classmate, however everyone that in that group can view these threads. 
  • You can attach or embed files/links/images or even a video.

But what do I say?

Online communication has its perks but it can also be intimidating. Often, getting started is the hardest part! 

  • A great writing strategy to remember is the PEEL acronym… 

Point. What point are you trying to make? Clearly state your point of view but also consider the point of view of others. Make comparisons or summarize the points of others. Most importantly, get to the point!!

Evidence and Explanation. Use full sentences to explain your thoughts carefully. Provide referenced evidence for information you share that is not your own. Embed or attach links when appropriate. 

Evaluate. Be Critical. Ask Questions. 

Link. Always link back to the larger course themes or conversations that have already taken place. This shows that you are engaged in class discussions.

Discussion Board Etiquette 

Here are some things to keep in mind when using Discussions in Canvas, email, Canvas Inbox, or any other online communication channel!

  1. Always use proper capitalization and punctuation.
  2. Consider your tone and remember that sarcasm and humour are often not appropriate in these types of online forums. 
  3. Make sure your posts are thoughtful and organized neatly.
  4. Don’t forget to include a formal greeting (‘Hello all!,’ ‘Hi everyone,’ or ‘Good afternoon!’)and goodbye: (‘Thanks for your time,’ or ‘All the best,’).
  5. Reference the contributions from others by mentioning them by name or by replying directly to their post. 

Check out this handy USask netiquette guide for more tips. 

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another.

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

For more support options with Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.

Getting Help with Canvas

Photo by Jessica Lewis from Pexels

Brette D. W. Kristoff, Graduate Student – Communications Specialist, GMCTL, 

November 16, 2020

Did you know Canvas has 24/7 live-chat technical support? Find out how to access it and other helpful Canvas resources below! 

Canvas Help Options

From your Global Navigation Menu, open the Help tab.

Here you’ll find a whole list of helpful resources for Canvas:

    • Browse the Canvas Guides for instructional videos on common Canvas questions. Access the Canvas Student Guides for detailed answers to your questions.
    • Use the Ask Your Instructor a Question feature if you have a specific question related to your course syllabus, assignments, or grades. Select the course in the drop down menu to message your instructor directly through Canvas. Easy!
      • Tip! Asking your instructors should be the last step after you review the course Syllabus and Discussion boards, where many FAQs may already be addressed. 
      • Remember to always include a formal greeting/goodbye!  

 Self Help Portal

  • The Self Help Portal is a newer Canvas feature where you can search FAQs, troubleshooting tips, and access to 24/7 live-chat technical support.
    • On the main Portal Support Centre page, type in your specific questions using the Canvas search engine.
    • Tip! Click on the chat bubble icon to find out current wait times for help options.
      • Click on the Chat to be connected with a Canvas support agent. Or, contact Canvas technical support by phone at:  1-855-382-5556.

USask Help with Canvas

  • For help to access your courses’ Panopto videos, try these instructions. If you still have Panopto issues, contact itsupport@usask.ca. Panopto is a separate video platform from Canvas and so the best option is USask support. For questions about WebEx or MEETS, itsupport@usask.ca is also your best option.
  • For answers to common questions, see Canvas Student FAQs written by IT Support Services.
  • The USask Students Canvas page has answers to the most Frequently Asked Questions.

We acknowledge that the University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis. We pay our respect to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another.

What’s been your biggest adjustment in transitioning to remote learning? I’d love to hear from you! Contact me at: brette.kristoff@usask.ca

For more detail about Canvas, see the USask Student Canvas page.