Volume 10, Number 11 February 7, 2003

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Research Briefs

Flanked by Saskatchewan Minister of Industry & Resources Eldon Lautermilch ad Acting U of S Vice-President Research Bryan Harvey, Associate Vice-President of Information & Communications Technology Rick Bunt gives details of the $15-million USR-net computer infrastructure project at a Jan. 30 news conference.   A well-received nine-minute videotape show about USR-net, produced by the University's Division of Media & Technology, was also shown to reporters.

Flanked by Saskatchewan Minister of Industry & Resources Eldon Lautermilch ad Acting U of S Vice-President Research Bryan Harvey, Associate Vice-President of Information & Communications Technology Rick Bunt gives details of the $15-million USR-net computer infrastructure project at a Jan. 30 news conference. A well-received nine-minute videotape show about USR-net, produced by the University's Division of Media & Technology, was also shown to reporters.

Campus computer network upgraded

The provincial government has provided $4.8 million as its share of a $15 million upgrade of the U of S Research Network (USR-net) to help meet growing demand from both the institution's research programs and the Canadian Light Source synchrotron.

The provincial contribution, which comes from the Innovation and Science Fund, was announced by Saskatchewan's Industry & Resources Minister Eldon Lautermilch at a news conference in the Agriculture Building atrium Jan. 30. The funding matches that made by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). The remaining funding will come from the U of S, suppliers and other sources. USR-net will connect up to 10,000 computers in more than 40 buildings on campus to provide upgraded service to faculty, staff and students.

U of S Information Services Technology staff said a lot of the infrastructure work has already been done, such as installing a lot of fibre-optic cable between buildings.

Livestock nutrition to be studied

U of S scientists along with their counterparts at the National Research Council's Plant Biotechnology Institute have been awarded nearly $1 million from a global food and animal nutrition company for research aimed at improving livestock health and finding alternatives to antibiotics.

The funding from Cargill will see molecular technology used to study the diverse species of organisms in the gastrointestinal tract of animals. This knowledge could improve livestock nutrition and point to effective alternatives to antibiotic use in agriculture. Cargill Feed Applications, suppliers of specialty feed products and programs, will have the opportunity to commercialize the research findings.

New research aid

A new, 300-page-long finding aid developed over the past three years will now be available to help scholars, students and researchers search for information in the more than 3,500 First Nations records held at the Diefenbaker Canada Centre.

Developed by Centre staff at a cost of over $50,000, the finding aid was funded primarily through interest from a trust fund left with the U of S by former prime minister John Diefenbaker. First Nations people and issues were a major concern of Diefenbaker, who appointed James Gladstone to the Senate, making him the first Aboriginal person to hold a seat in Canada's upper chamber.

Biomaterials study funded

Provincial funding of more than $145,000 will help the U of S Department of Chemistry to purchase equipment to produce and study new biomaterials that may have potential applications in artificial heart valves and other medical implants.

The Innovation and Science Fund money matches a contribution from the Canada Foundation for Innovation under a program to help new faculty acquire the infrastructure necessary to conduct world-class research. The work will also assess nanomaterials (structures smaller than one-billionth of a metre) for its compatibility with the body and resistance to infection.

Database looks at urban Aboriginals

A $125,000 urban Aboriginal database project at the University of Saskatchewan has received a $50,000 investment from a provincial Innovation and Science Fund initiative designed to provide research infrastructure.

The money, which matches a Canada Foundation for Innovation contribution, will help researchers gather more detailed information on one of the province's fastest growing populations.By better analysing population growth and demographic change, socio-economic structure and economic participation, governments and other institutions can design better programs for urban Aboriginals.


For more information, contact communications.office@usask.ca


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